A Plea for Fewer Takes

I’m not interested in your take on Caitlyn Jenner. I’m not interested in your take on on ISIS. I’m not interested in your take on religion.

The take is ascendant. Everybody has one; my Facebook feed is full of peoples’ takes on Ted Cruz, LeBron James, The Pope, and everything or everyone else imaginable. My take is my opinion, grounded in my unique perspective, guided by my personal convictions, informed by TMZ–harmless, really, and yet utterly useless for constructive deliberation.

Instead of your take, share your angle. Relate your experience, please, and if that experience compels you to have a take, please please please inform that take with information from outside your personal experience. Please. That’s an angle, and that’s valuable.

We are awash in competing commentary. We need more angles.

Here’s a great example. 

Personal experience:

Law school is a very good way to solve the problem of being ineligible for a license to practice law. It is not a very good way to solve the “I don’t know what to do with my life” problem, or the “I am afraid that if I follow my true passion I will fail” problem, or the “I am desperate for other people’s approval” problem.

And analysis of information:

According to the American Bar Association, only 71 percent of 2014 law school graduates were able to obtain long-term, full-time employment as lawyers (defined as jobs that either required them to pass the bar, or preferred to hire candidates with JDs). That means that one in four law school graduates were either unemployed or were doing jobs they could have gotten without ever going to law school.

Presto. An angle (by the way, if you try to pass off other peoples’ takes as information, we will know).

Down with takes. Let’s have more angles.

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