Give Yourself Something To Work With

I’m in this routine since September where each week I’m designing Sunday curriculum for two different youth gatherings. My colleague spent a couple of August weeks designing all of his for the whole year. I wish I had done that. Next year it won’t be as much of an issue, because I will have the material I made this year to work with.

Having something to work with feels like a great benefit. Having to create ex nihilo is challenging and rewarding and important, but set yourself up with too many of those projects at the same time and you’ll burn out.

And, of course, everything is a project. Cooking Thanksgiving dinner is a project, so store up material to work with this year by doing the turkey or experimenting with green beans, so that next year, or three years from now, when the whole thing unexpectedly falls to you, you’re not starting at zero.

Knowing what’s going on in the world is a project, too. Reading reliable news reporting on Syria or health care policy today gives you material to work with when one of those issues suddenly becomes urgent and everyone else is scrambling to learn about it.

Accept and seek out elective challenges when you don’t have to, so that when you do have to you’ve at least got something to work with.

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